Author Topic: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System  (Read 161 times)

mb101

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Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« on: August 23, 2019, 07:36:52 PM »
With my neighbor's help, I was finally able to start the car. It turned out it was the burned out ballast resistor that was causing the problem. I'm moving on to the fuel system now as I think the car is starving for fuel.

My plan is to remove the fuel tank, replace the hose/lines, fuel filter, maybe also the pump? I don't see any leaks under the car, but I still think it'll be a good idea to go through the fuel system. I'm still not sure what to buy at this point. I checked pelican parts, and saw so many different hoses/lines/fuel filters there. I guess I'll have a better idea after I get under the car...

I borrowed my brother's hydraulic jack and four jack stands. So, I think I'm well equipped with the tools to jack it up, but I don't know where I should place the jack and the stands. My brother doesn't know much about vintage cars, but he warned me to find out the right place to place the jack and the stands before I proceed. We found some information on how to jack w123. But I couldn't find much about w111. Is it safe if I follow the w123 guidelines?https://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Mercedes-W123/54-BASICS-Jacking_Up_Your_W123/54-BASICS-Jacking_Up_Your_W123.htm
and
https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Mercedes+W123+Jack+Technique/22770


LWB250

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2019, 07:04:13 AM »
In the front of the car I use the unibody frame rails, that is, if you look into the front wheel well and follow the back edge of the wheel well towards the underside/back of the car, you'll see the frame rail as it goes from the firewall down and along the transmission tunnel. There's plenty of room there to place a floor jack under the rail with a 2x4 on it so as to spread the load and prevent the jack saddle from scratching up the rail. Once lifted, you can find plenty of room on the rail to place a jack stand under it.

As for the rear, it's a bit trickier.

I like to jack up the rear by getting under the differential case and lifting from there. I'm not sur gif this is OK or not, but I've done it for some time and not found any issues with doing it this way. Once I have the car in the air, I place jack stands under the forward swing arm mounts and then lower the jack.

You can use the factory jack points, but it's tricky to do so and not damage or distort the rocker panels. The factory jack points are intended to be used with the jack, which uses a large pin or rod to go into the times at the jack points. Going underneath the jack points can, as mentioned previously, damage the surrounding sheet metal of the rocker panel.

Dan

mb101

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2019, 02:53:25 AM »
In the front of the car I use the unibody frame rails, that is, if you look into the front wheel well and follow the back edge of the wheel well towards the underside/back of the car, you'll see the frame rail as it goes from the firewall down and along the transmission tunnel. There's plenty of room there to place a floor jack under the rail with a 2x4 on it so as to spread the load and prevent the jack saddle from scratching up the rail. Once lifted, you can find plenty of room on the rail to place a jack stand under it.

As for the rear, it's a bit trickier.

I like to jack up the rear by getting under the differential case and lifting from there. I'm not sur gif this is OK or not, but I've done it for some time and not found any issues with doing it this way. Once I have the car in the air, I place jack stands under the forward swing arm mounts and then lower the jack.

You can use the factory jack points, but it's tricky to do so and not damage or distort the rocker panels. The factory jack points are intended to be used with the jack, which uses a large pin or rod to go into the times at the jack points. Going underneath the jack points can, as mentioned previously, damage the surrounding sheet metal of the rocker panel.

Dan

Thanks so much for the help!

The car is now up in the air, and I just removed the fuel tank today. I found this weird white stuff under the fuel tank. It seemed like some kind of "patch" which I don't think it was supposed to be there...  ???
Muffler is also... :'(

LWB250

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2019, 05:58:52 AM »
Looks like the cover for the screen was leaking and they slathered some kind of patching material over it to stop the leak. When you remove the screen be sure to replace the seal.

Most of the mufflers are still available from Mercedes. I put a new one on my 220SE and I think it was around $250.

Dan


mb101

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #4 on: August 29, 2019, 08:55:22 PM »
My plan was to go through the fuel lines/hoses, fuel filter, and replace the rubber parts, fuel filter. But I couldn't find the fuel filter :'(

I traced the fuel line from where it connected to the fuel tank to the fuel pump (I think that is the fuel pump, and it is not leaking. So I'm thinking that I don't have to mess with it), then to the carburetors. There one yellowish part there, but it doesn't look like the fuel filters that I see on Pelicanparts. Am I missing anything?


Squiggle Dog

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2019, 01:26:25 AM »
It looks like someone used a fuel filter for a lawnmower. It should be able to be replaced with whatever Pelican Parts has that they say fits.
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mb101

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2019, 01:30:04 PM »
It looks like someone used a fuel filter for a lawnmower. It should be able to be replaced with whatever Pelican Parts has that they say fits.

Lawnmower fuel filter  >:(

I think I found the right filter on pelican parts! I'll order soon :)


Squiggle Dog

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #7 on: August 31, 2019, 01:19:51 AM »
That should be the correct one. I actually like clear plastic filters so I can see the quality of the fuel and if the filter is getting plugged with debris. You can probably find a large size clear one at an auto parts store, but it's all preference, really. The filter currently on there may be too small anyway.
Stop paying for animal enslavement, cruelty, and slaughter. Save your health and the planet. Go vegan! I did 15 years ago. https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 230 Universal Wagon Project
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel 346,000

Cth350

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Re: Jacking up the Car and Fuel System
« Reply #8 on: August 31, 2019, 01:40:33 PM »
definitely replace the fuel strainer in the tank. That's embedded inside the part they coated with epoxy.  Get the tank boiled out at a radiator shop. Consider getting it coated (ask the shop guy and take his advice).

When dropping the tank, you'll find the fuel level sender is plugged into the top and accessible through a hole in the center of the trunk floor.  Just remove the trunk mat and you'll see the spot. Also, expect to find other bits of epoxy on the tank. That won't be a good sign. The good news is that all the 111 and 108 tanks interchange, so a good used one is findable.

When you put the tank back, replace the little fitted hose between the tank and the metal fuel line. It is a shaped hose. The fuel line side is narrower than the tank end of it.

-CTH