Author Topic: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets  (Read 541 times)

Squiggle Dog

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Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« on: March 01, 2019, 08:37:31 PM »
I want to install seat nets from a W123 into a fintail. Where can I get the rivets to do so, and how do I install them? Also, where can I get suitable, durable, round bungee cord to fix the tops so they don't sag?


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1967 W110 230 Universal Wagon Project
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel 346,000

LWB250

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2019, 08:58:37 PM »
Don't know about the rivets, but in W123s and W126s that I've owned with saggy nets I just shortened up the top piece of bungee and that did the trick.

Dan

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2019, 12:57:29 AM »
So far my own research has found that I can get 10' of new 1/4" weather and UV-resistant black shock cord for $8.95 and free shipping on Amazon. Apparently the metal clamps on the end of the bungee can be pried off and clamped onto the new cord. The rivets used appear to be aluminum tubular (hollow) rivets for use with 3/8" thick material. The hole size is yet to be determined. It seems a special punch is needed and hitting the rivet from the backside will secure it and then it can be flattened further to be completely flush.

While slack can be taken out of the top cord by shortening and stretching it, I like the idea of having them functional with new elastic because you KNOW someone is going to try to put things in them, and I think it's neat having vintage literature in there.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2019, 12:59:28 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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LWB250

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2019, 07:29:32 AM »
So far my own research has found that I can get 10' of new 1/4" weather and UV-resistant black shock cord for $8.95 and free shipping on Amazon. Apparently the metal clamps on the end of the bungee can be pried off and clamped onto the new cord. The rivets used appear to be aluminum tubular (hollow) rivets for use with 3/8" thick material. The hole size is yet to be determined. It seems a special punch is needed and hitting the rivet from the backside will secure it and then it can be flattened further to be completely flush.

While slack can be taken out of the top cord by shortening and stretching it, I like the idea of having them functional with new elastic because you KNOW someone is going to try to put things in them, and I think it's neat having vintage literature in there.

True. Consider that the last set I did was pre-Amazon, so sources for the cord were nowhere near as available at the time.

Dan

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2019, 11:18:17 AM »
The shock cord is actually 3/16", but you have to buy 50' of it instead of 10' to get the good Dacron stuff if you want black. Ace Hardware had compression rivets, but only in brass, so I'll have to order them online. Also, the factory rivets were steel, not aluminum. I was able to get the metal ball clamps off the ends of the old bungee, but I had to burn them off and then pry up the teeth with a tiny screwdriver so they will accept the new cord.
« Last Edit: March 04, 2019, 11:40:48 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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Hkollan

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2019, 03:48:22 PM »
I bought some meters of 5mm black elastic chord whilst refreshing the interior of my W112.

Got it here:
https://www.extremtextil.de/elastische-kordel-5mm-rund.html?number=70037.SW

Not very expensve and Quite similar to the original cord. Sold per meter.

Hans K


Squiggle Dog

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2019, 05:17:05 PM »
I bought some meters of 5mm black elastic chord whilst refreshing the interior of my W112.

Got it here:
https://www.extremtextil.de/elastische-kordel-5mm-rund.html?number=70037.SW

Not very expensve and Quite similar to the original cord. Sold per meter.

Hans K

Those look great!
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Squiggle Dog

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2019, 11:59:03 PM »
I cut off the plated steel ball ends which were crimped onto the old bungee cord. I could not find replacements anywhere, so I decided they would have to be reused. I tried lifting the teeth but it was too difficult, so I ended up burning out the bungee cord with a torch while being careful to not damage the plating. Then after pounding out the ashes, I was able to pry up on the teeth with a small screwdriver. They should only be opened up just enough to get the new cord inside.


We got new heavy duty marine weather and UV-resistant Dacron bungee (or shock) cord from Sgt. Knots on Amazon. Unfortunately, we had to buy 50' of it because that's the shortest length the black 3/16" comes in. But, it was worth it. I think it will last longer than the original, and certainly longer than some cheap dollar store cord.


It looks similar to the original cord, but with a tighter weave.


The bungee cord is really what keeps the nets from sagging. The nets themselves are almost always good, but the cord loses its elasticity and stretches out. I wove the new cord through the nets and the eyelets of the frame.


After cutting the cord, I immediately burned the end with a lighter just enough so it prevented it from fraying and then while it was still hot I pressed it in with my fingers to minimalize flaring. Then I pressed the cord into the ball end, which I had soaked in Evapo-Rust and polished. I placed some vinyl underneath the ball end and closed the teeth around the cord by striking them with a screwdriver and hammer.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:02:17 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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Squiggle Dog

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2019, 12:21:12 AM »
After getting the teeth pressed down a bit, I pushed them in further with channel lock pliers covered in electrical tape to protect the metal surface.


After that, I tapped down the teeth again with a screwdriver and hammer until they were properly secured.


Then I went onto the other side of the net, which was more difficult because I had to stretch the cord over since I cut it short so it would end up taught. It wasn't very difficult with the net off of the seat back, but with it in place it would probably be very challenging or impossible. I found that once the cord was somewhat secure in the ball end, I was able to tap down the teeth through the eyelet with a screwdriver.


I was having a difficult time finding rivets like what came from the nets. The W123 seat nets have smaller clamps and rivets than the W108/W109/W110/W111/W112 seat nets--which rivets would likely be easier to find. I finally found that TierraCast makes 6mm rivets for arts and crafts--which look identical to the originals, only they are silver plated brass instead of nickle plated steel.


The post goes in through the back side and sticks out the top. The TierraCast rivets were barely long enough to work. We put cotton padding under the new MB-tex vinyl, which probably made setting the rivets more difficult.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:29:07 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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Squiggle Dog

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #9 on: March 11, 2019, 12:28:22 AM »
The cap went on top and then I used a concave TierraCast 6mm rivet setting punch and had to hit it hard several times before the rivet halves would stay together.


After this I used some heavy washers and a small C-clamp and cranked down hard until the rivets were compressed good and tight.


And then for extra security, I used large channel lock pliers to really squish them down.


They came out looking flat just like the originals and should be secure.


The backside is flush-mounted so the rivets won't interfere with sliding into the back of the seat.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:31:10 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #10 on: March 11, 2019, 12:41:52 AM »
An old seat back panel is pictured on the left--it has a sagging pocket and holes where headrest brackets used to be. The panel on the right is the newly made one from 1/8" masonite board, covered in 701 Black MB-Tex from GAHH, with a seat net from a 1980s W123, which is almost identical to the scarce W108/W109/W110/W111/W112 net--it is only just slightly narrower.


The pair of newly-made seat back panels with refurbished nets.


The seat panels in place! They are such an improvement and a worthwhile upgrade. The bottom middle seat net clamp coincides with the screw which secures the panel to the seat back, so a rivet is not needed for this one.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2019, 12:52:12 AM by Squiggle Dog »
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LWB250

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #11 on: March 11, 2019, 07:38:06 AM »
Nice job!  Looks like it was supposed to be that way.

You should offer up the remains of the cord for sale to offset your expenses.... you probably have what - 47 feet of the stuff left?

I love this sort of DIY thing that looks so good.  A lot like my windlace project on the 220SEb.

Dan

Hkollan

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Re: Transplanting And Repairing Seat Nets
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2019, 11:04:54 AM »
Well done, the result looks perfect.

Hans K