Author Topic: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project  (Read 3464 times)

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #90 on: June 12, 2019, 05:44:58 AM »
Hi Dan, nice work as usual.
Some questions about the job on the rear end please:
- To get the 'rhino horn'/central support arm off (and the tip of it out of the trunk), did you have to lower the whole assembly down, but without removing the trailing arms and springs? If so, did the diff drop right down to its max limit of travel at the bottom, or did the transverse centre spring stop it from doing this? Did you use a jack under the main body of the diff to control the height?
   - I ask as i got told to never let the rear end sag in the middle with its axle tubes up as high as possible with load on them, as it could damage something called the sliding joint. But the rearws are so heavy, i have never figured out how to avoid it. I have swapped a few rear ends out, but have never seemed to have damaged anything.
- With the centering rod, did you have trouble getting the new bushes on the end where it joins the body? I found that the new ones that were so thick compared to the old compressed ones, that i couldn't get enough threaded rod through the mount on the body to tighten it up. You mention it, but don't say how you solved it - or did jacking up the diff do it?  I frigged around with clamps and really struggled. i can't even remember how i succeeded in the end - perhaps i have erased my memory, like women do with the pain of childbirth?! So do you have any tips for that part of the job?
- what is "Mercedes black sealant"? Any pictures, and where did you get it? Is there a generic equivalent?
I see you want to change the bushes on the trailing arms. That can be a bugger too, getting the front on over the mounting point on the car without popping the new bush out of the trailing arm. Sometimes it has gone easy for me, other times i have taken a whole day and needed a mate to help. Good luck with it. Considering you still have to do this, apart from the extra work to take the brake hoses off and bleed brakes, do you not think it would have been easier to pull the whole rear end out and do everything without lying under the car?

Cheers, Drew in Oz

Sorry, Drew, just saw your questions...

Yes, I did lower the differential down as far as it would go without removing the springs or trailing arms. And I used a floor jack to support it the whole time. I was surprised when I started moving the support amor around that it had enough range of movement to come off of the pivot rod. No doubt much of this was due to not only the lowering of th differential, but the rubber bushing having been removed.

I didn't change any of the positions of the nuts on the centering rod, so when I placed the new bushings on it I found that the rod barely projected beyond the top of the outer bushing, and even then the threaded potion wasn't exposed. I used my floor jack to raise the differential and apply some pressure to the centering rod and bushings, exposing enough of the threads to get the nut started with the metal cup in place.  Once started, it was a simple matter of tightening the nut to the original position and compressing the bushings.

The Mercedes black sealant is part number 003-989-98-20-10 and is the equivalent to Loctite 5970, I believe. Mercedes uses it for just about every metal to metal application. It does need time to set up or "skin", so you can't be in a hurry to use it.

When I first got the car I changed the swing arm bushing at the body on the left side. It wasn't hard to do, but did require some assistance to get everything lined up and in position to reassemble it. At the time I hadn't considered replacing all the rear axle/suspension rubber bits, only this one, as it was in pretty bad shape. If I wasn't concerned about opening up a big can of worms by messing with my brake lines or being very limited in the space I have to work in, I would have dropped the whole rear axle to do the work. It wasn't as bad as I expected, but would certainly have been easier to do out of the car, without question.

Hope this helps.

Dan

drew56cus

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #91 on: June 15, 2019, 04:02:35 AM »
Thanks for the reply Dan.
I got this gizmo turned up to make it easier to get the front of the trailing arms fitted up. It has a threaded hole in the bottom that I screw onto the body, then lube it up, and it helps the rubber slip up and onto the mounting point without coming out of the trailing arm.

Cheers, Drew
Not sure if the pic attached... Not sure how to do it either!
A few W111 and W112 projects...

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #92 on: June 25, 2019, 05:43:40 PM »
That's pretty slick, Drew. Wish I had one of those when I did my rear swing arm bushings...

But they're done, as is all of the body and suspension rubber I'm replacing on this car. Finally!

http://penoff.com/1965_220SEb_Blog/Entries/2019/6/25_Back_in_the_Swing_of_Things.html

Dan

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #93 on: June 30, 2019, 10:24:47 AM »

Squiggle Dog

  • Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 448
  • IMA Universal Wagon Lover
    • View Profile
    • Fintail.org
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #94 on: June 30, 2019, 03:00:30 PM »
That's one of those things that makes a big improvement in appearance. I'm sure the previous owner would be amazed at the progress you've made.
Stop paying for animal enslavement, cruelty, and slaughter. Save your health and the planet. Go vegan! I did 15 years ago. https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 230 Universal Wagon Project
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel 346,000

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #95 on: June 30, 2019, 04:25:00 PM »
They are. They follow the blog pretty closely, as I still hear from them occasionally.

The woman that owned the car is pretty old, and I suspect may be suffering some of the ravages of aging. I set up a phone call with her on several occasions via her son in law, who sold the car, and each time they've backed out before we were able to do it. The son in law hasn't said anything directly, but has implied that mom in law's memory isn't great and it's unlikely that she'll have anything of significance to add to the background on the car.

Dan

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile

Squiggle Dog

  • Moderator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 448
  • IMA Universal Wagon Lover
    • View Profile
    • Fintail.org
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #97 on: August 02, 2019, 06:19:01 PM »
You've accomplished a lot with that vehicle and it should give you and others who see it plenty of enjoyment for years to come. Thanks for keeping us updated on the progress.
Stop paying for animal enslavement, cruelty, and slaughter. Save your health and the planet. Go vegan! I did 15 years ago. https://challenge22.com/

1967 W110 230 Universal Wagon Project
1980 W116 300SD Turbo Diesel 346,000

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #98 on: August 02, 2019, 07:42:34 PM »
Yeah, it's wiped me out. I purposely went at it like a crazy person, as the latter half of this year has a lot of obligations in it that won't allow me anywhere near the time I've spent on it up to now.

Dan

LWB250

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 361
    • View Profile
Re: W111 1965 220SEb "Restoration" Project
« Reply #99 on: September 17, 2019, 06:13:52 PM »
The finnie began it's journey back to the Fatherland today.

The transporter came to pick it up this afternoon to take it to the Port of Ft. Lauderdale to be prepared for ocean shipment. It was fun while it lasted and I'm sure it will be happy going back to Germany.

On to the next project after a short breather...