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Messages - Squiggle Dog

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1
Parts / For Sale: 2 Rear Windshields For W110/W111/W112 Sedan
« on: May 22, 2020, 04:58:46 PM »
I have two rear windshields for sale for the W110/W111/W112 sedans. They are non-tinted and made of laminated glass.

$100 each. Local pickup only in Phoenix, Arizona, USA.



2
A W110 chassis which is clearly not an Arizona native.

3
A once-restored 1961 W111 220 like mine languishing in a wrecking yard in Arizona, USA a couple hours away from me. It should be back on the road, as it doesn't seem rusty.


The outside of the car is in amazing condition. The paint would probably even shine up.


It had a really nice interior until someone destroyed the dashboard pad trying to remove it and broke out the windows.


Beautiful air conditioning unit.


I'd love to put the seats and door panels in my 220, but don't have the cash. I also wish someone would save the whole car, but don't know if they'd sell the whole thing.

4
I was at a wrecking yard a couple hours away from my house in Arizona and saw some fintails. This is the same yard where I scored the sunroof top. They've got a 1965 W112 300SE Coupe. Someone didn't know what they had.


Huge M189 fuel injected 6 cylinder engine with air compressor for the air suspension.


It appears someone already got the air bagged disc brake rear axle.


Sunroof mechanism is all there and doesn't seem rusted.


Rough interior, but still some scarce parts.

5
Parts / For Sale: Air Conditioning Compressor Bracket
« on: May 21, 2020, 06:58:51 PM »
I'm selling an air conditioning compressor bracket removed from a 1965 Mercedes-Benz W111 220 with M180 6 cylinder gasoline engine. It should fit other cars with M180 engines such as 220/S ponton, 220/S/E fintail, 230/S fintail, and possibly 230SL pagoda.

It may even fit the 4 cylinder gasoline engines, but I do not know. It's not recommended for diesel engines due to it not having rubber spacers to absorb engine vibration.

This will fit common York compressors, however you can easily install a modern and efficient Sanden with the use of a commonly-found adapter bracket.

Comes with the required spacers and support bar. York compressor NOT included unless you want to pay for the extra shipping cost. I do still have the Mark IV air conditioning unit (not included), but you probably wouldn't want it because it's a bit rough and sticks out really far on these cars.

The price is $160USD plus shipping from Phoenix, Arizona, USA to anywhere in the world.







6
It turns out it was the previous owner who still had the door listed and forgot about it. He took it down. Mystery solved. Considering the price of the door, he gave me a really good deal on the whole car (a 100% discount). Haha.

7
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 18, 2020, 03:43:18 PM »
It turns out it was the previous owner who still had the door listed and forgot about it. He took it down. Mystery solved. Considering the price of the door, he gave me a really good deal on the whole car (a 100% discount). Haha.

8
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 15, 2020, 12:27:45 AM »
Well, this is strange... This is clearly the same door that is currently on my 220. It wasn't on the car when I got it, but I installed it, and it's on there now. But, someone is trying to sell it for the unreal price of $1,490.00!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/142903616459?epid=1323553502&hash=item2145b823cb:g:1boAAOSwofdbcNzW




Picture from the ad:


Picture of the door before I put it back on the car:


Picture of the door on my car:


I checked, and the door is still on the car! I messaged this to the seller:

"Hi, do you know if this door will fit a 1965 Mercedes 220? Someone stole the driver side door on mine and I'm hoping to find one that will work. It looks like you're local, so I won't have to ship. A picture of my car is attached (before the door was stolen). Let me know if yours will work. Thanks!"

And then I attached a picture of my car with the door on it. It will be interesting to see what response I get.

9
The door is still on the car! I messaged this to the seller:

"Hi, do you know if this door will fit a 1965 Mercedes 220? Someone stole the driver side door on mine and I'm hoping to find one that will work. It looks like you're local, so I won't have to ship. A picture of my car is attached (before the door was stolen). Let me know if yours will work. Thanks!"

And then I attached the picture below:

10
Well, this is strange... This is clearly the same door that is currently on my 220. It wasn't on the car when I got it, but I installed it, and it's on there now. Check out the unreal price of $1,490!

https://www.ebay.com/itm/142903616459?epid=1323553502&hash=item2145b823cb:g:1boAAOSwofdbcNzW




Picture from the ad:


Picture of the door before I put it back on the car:


Picture of the door on my car:

11
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 03, 2020, 04:21:41 PM »
Victory! I'd been searching for a non-rusty W111 with a sunroof for many years but couldn't acquire one. However, the free 220 was a good start, even though it didn't have a sunroof. So, I started looking for a sunroof top.

The cheapest one I could find was in Virginia, but I worried about it being rusty and shipping would have been expensive. There was one in California, too, but without being able to inspect it first, making the long drive seemed risky.

Yesterday my roommate had me pick up a tailgate for his 1965 Ford station wagon at a wrecking yard. Unfortunately, the tailgate was rusted out, but I found some chrome trim for him. There were some fintails there, including a really nice 220 and 300SE coupe. Then I saw this sunroof top laying on the ground. I couldn't believe my luck! It didn't have any more than surface rust on it.




I managed to talk the yard down to a price I could afford, strapped it to my roof, and drove home with it.

12
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 03, 2020, 03:49:42 PM »
I determined that in order to get the timing chain put on correctly, I'd need to either remove the rocker arms or the head. Since I was interested in seeing how the cylinder walls looked, I chose the latter. After I removed the head, I noticed the cylinders had seeds in them!


They must have gotten in through the spark plug holes since the car didn't have any when I got it.


I was pleased with how the cylinder walls look. There was hardly any lip at the tops, and there were maybe only a couple of very light vertical scratches. This engine would probably run very well for a long time.




Unfortunately, I didn't get the timing chain installed correctly. Something is really goofy! I got cylinder #1 to top dead center, observing the cylinder reaching its highest point. However, with the #1 cylinder at top dead center, the timing marks on the crank damper appear to be off 180 degrees. The pointer by the crank damper lines up close to top dead center when the #3 and #4 cylinders are at top dead center. So I wonder if someone installed the crank damper 180 degrees off?

I left the #1 cylinder at top dead center and then put the head on and installed the timing chain with the cam marks lined up. But, the pistons would still hit the valves! So, then I just kept moving the timing chain one tooth at a time to see if I could get it to a spot where the engine would do a full rotation. Nope! There wasn't a single tooth that I could place the chain where it would work. I don't understand it.

I noticed that the crank damper has a 127 part number, which is odd because I think it should have a 180 part number. Do you think that someone installed a crank from an M127 into an M180 engine? But then when I looked at the factory service manual, they appear to be configured the same. It seems as though the crank and cam aren't compatible. I'm really stumped. Where's Tram when you need him?

13
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 03, 2020, 03:24:58 PM »
I was curious to know the condition of the engine. I poured Marvel Mystery Oil into the cylinders to soak.


I attempted to turn over the engine, but it wouldn't rotate. Then I noticed that there was a bolt jammed up against the crank damper. So, it came out.


I was then able to rotate the crank, but only 180 degrees and then it would get stuck. I checked the timing marks, and it appears that someone installed the timing chain incorrectly. The pistons are hitting the valves. The cam lobes appear to be in good condition, but there is a screw missing for the oiling tube.


I had promised the engine and automatic transmission to my roommate as spares for his 220S, so out they came. I'm going to be installing an OM617 5 cylinder turbo diesel engine and 4 speed manual column shift transmission, anyway.


14
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 03, 2020, 02:58:04 PM »
I've been wanting a collapsible steering column from a column shift car with a manual transmission. The collapsible steering column and deformable steering wheel hub were only installed on late production 1967 and 1968 model year vehicles. At this time, floor shift became more popular than column shift, and a column shift manual transmission was almost nonexistent.


Scoot found me one from a column shifted car with an automatic transmission, but it wouldn't work with a manual transmission because of the shift shaft being different. After searching EPC, I found that the W108 took the same shift shaft as the W110 and W111, but finding a late production column shift manual steering column was next to impossible, too.


Old Merc Guy in South Africa had one, but he wouldn't ship to the USA. Then I found this one in Australia on Gumtree, but it was right hand drive. However, the shift shaft is the same between the left and right hand drive cars; only the plastic knob is printed upside-down. I contacted the seller, but was ignored.


So, I asked if anyone in Australia could help me. Drew56cus needed the housing for one of his projects, so he picked it up and sent me the shift shaft and related parts. So now I can convert the automatic steering column I got from Scoot into a manual shift steering column!

15
Progress / Re: Saving A 1965 W111 220
« on: May 03, 2020, 02:33:03 PM »
When I was cleaning out the trunk, I found a hood ornament!


I found a service booklet showing it spending the first several months in Germany, with the Becker Europa radio paperwork and data cards. The Classic Center wanted $150 plus a driver's license and registration or title for data cards, so I saved some money there!


The 220 didn't have a title. The normal course of operation would be to apply for a lost title, and take the vehicle to the Department of Motor Vehicles, or arrange for an inspection--all of which is a hassle and can be expensive. But, I found a loophole, which was registering in the state of Vermont, and then registering it in Arizona.

Here are a couple videos that explain the process: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8sWBqgP1PI and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pgK4pbaA1g .

Have the person selling the car fill out their part of a Bill of Sale: https://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/documents/VT-005-Bill_Of_Sale_Odometer_Cert.pdf and Vermont registration application form: https://dmv.vermont.gov/sites/dmv/files/documents/VD-119-Vehicle_Reg_Tax_Title_App_0.pdf ( https://dmv.vermont.gov/registrations/new ).

Then you mail in those two documents with a check for the total amount which you have to calculate (keep in mind you need to pay the NADA value for your car, no matter how much you actually paid for it--make sure it's what NADA currently says it's worth!). After a few weeks if it's accepted, they'll mail you a registration and a license plate.

You do not need to be a resident of Vermont, and you do not have to appear in person in Vermont nor have the vehicle inspected there. Anything you have to do besides mailing them a form and a check would be a requirement of the state in which you reside.

Then you take the registration paper and license plate to your state's Department of Motor Vehicles and tell them that Vermont does not issue titles on older vehicles. Then they'll give you a title, registration, and plate in your state, unless they absolutely have to have an inspection. In this case, you'll have to either bring the car with you to the licensing office (probably best if it not have your state's plate on it), or you'll have to arrange to have a police officer come by to inspect the vehicle at your house and then bring in the form the officer signs with you.

Also, keep in mind there could potentially be a problem if you register your vehicle in the same state in which you bought it AND it has been reported as stolen or there is a lien on the lost title.

My 220 had a low NADA value of $4,375 in Vermont at the time. The total registration fees were $285.50--$262.50 of it was tax. Vermont only charges 6% sales tax on vehicles. I registered it with an antique plate, as that was the least expensive way. I mailed off the paperwork to Vermont on January 21st and received the plates and registration by February 11th, so it took a total of three weeks. No notary or inspection of the vehicle was required.


After receiving the Vermont plate and registration, I went to the Department of Motor Vehicles and got an Arizona title, registration, and plate. It cost me $80.75 to title and register the $4,375 low NADA value car in Arizona on top of the $285.50 it cost to register it in Vermont.

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